Category Archives: Sponsors

What the Tour of Bintan taught me about trading

A few years ago I foolishly signed up to participate in the Tour of Bintan Gran Fondo with some colleagues, including OANDA’s regional CEO, a seasoned pro. I must confess to some trepidation, but I figured if Singapore is flat, then Bintan must be too. Clearly this was a terrible error on my part, further compounded by the fact that so many of my co-workers were keen cyclists, and several even competed in Ironman competitions for fun.

They had no problem getting out of bed at silly o’clock in the morning to train, but as a Kiwi used to long open roads and a variety of routes to choose from, doing lap after lap of the Red Dot was anathema to me. I have a low boredom threshold and I also like to sleep in on weekends, so this was far from my cup of tea.

I managed a grand total of one training ride in Singapore before traipsing over to Bintan with the group to train on the actual course a couple of weeks before the tour itself. My emotions ran higher than my pulse when I discovered that the earth was not flat on Bintan. Quite the opposite actually.

To cut a long story short, I was left behind by my colleagues halfway through, weakest lion cub peloton style, and as a result I completed the remaining 60km of the course perched on the back of scooter, clutching my precious bike as we sped along.

Photo courtesy of Fatih Muftih / Batam Pos.

With this fantastic preparation, I took my place on the morning of the tour, ready for my 150km “day out” in the tropics. I felt good about the rolling start right up until I reached the first hill. After that, the only cyclists who seemed to be going slower than me were those who had already crashed and lay sprawled on the side of the road. And I do mean literally on the side of the road – I never knew cycling was a blood sport.

I pedalled away, mostly on my own, throughout the day, making the time cut-offs, losing so many fluids that I actually stopped sweating. Going through terrain that resembled a volcanic scoria field in the blazing heat, I was almost delirious and hallucinating about a three-litre party bottle of coca cola. Full fat coca cola. (I never drink coke) Then it started to rain, and I mean really rain, at which point I yelled, “For #%$^@#% sake, could this day get any worse?” At this point a boat full of animals and a bearded man in robes floated past me.

A strange thing happened though. Eventually, I began to find my stride. Maybe my body was so dehydrated, I was osmosing the water through my skin. I started speeding up and by the second checkpoint I was flying, in my mind anyway. I got into a rhythm going up the long hills and coasted down the back, and I even started using the little robot thing on my handlebars to track my pace and speed.

Sure enough, some six hours after I started, I arrived at the finish line on my little Fuji. I say little because I am usually a front row prop in rugby and it sort of looked small on me. The feeling of achievement was really quite indescribable, as was the fear I would never be able to father children. Ever. I also went straight to a local shop and bought an unfeasibly large bottle of coke.

I will admit my training regime was perhaps lacking and maybe I should have put my ego and boredom quotient aside and done those laps of the island, but I did actually learn I had a lot more willpower and drive than I ever realised. I stopped being afraid of those long hills and started looking forward to them as I knew how I would tackle them before, and they stopped hurting quite so much, unlike my behind.

Trading is much the same. If you lose a lot of money, your bum will hurt as much as your ego and your wallet. If you go into it ill prepared and you don’t do the training, you won’t enjoy a good experience either. How you manage your risk and your losses comes down to mental attitude, and I promise you, that as a self-directed trader, you will lose money at some point. The trick lies in your attitude when that happens, managing your risk properly and losing a lot less than those times you make money.

At OANDA we won’t promise you unrealistic riches for little to no effort. We won’t tell you that you can make risk-free returns. Dedication, preparation and attitude can do that for you. Much like preparing for cycle tours. A recurring theme I see amongst you in these blog posts.

What we can promise you is a fantastic platform with some great products to trade. We will teach you to manage your risk and the correct mindset to be a self-directed trader. We WILL NOT allow you to use excessive leverage, and we’ll treat you the same whether you have SGD1k or SGD1mn. (OANDA was founded by two professors on this democratic principle)

At OANDA you will find down to earth, friendly people whose mission is to help you on your trading journey and to treat you with integrity and respect. Always. We look forward to meeting you soon.

Jeffrey Halley, Senior Market Analyst
OANDA Asia Pacific

Dimension Data

Dimension Data is all about using information technology to transform the businesses of our clients to enable them to achieve great things in the digital era.  We do this for many of the Fortune and Global 500 companies around the world and in Asia – to bring their cloud, collaboration, networking, communication and digital business ambitions together.  And to keep it all secure, managed and delivering results.

This is what we also do with the Amaury Sports Organisation – the company that owns the Tour de France. Our role has been and is to transform their business, to use the power of data to bring viewers closer to the action in the TdF – to make the audience feel part of the event.  People today don’t just watch the racing, they experience it through the apps, data and analytics we deliver real-time directly to them, and to broadcasters and commentators around the world.

This passion for cycling also drove us to sponsor Team Dimension Data for Qhubeka – an elite cycling team who has a greater purpose – to race for a cause. Bicycles change lives, and Team Dimension Data works with Qhubeka to change the lives of some of the lowest income communities throughout Africa. Qhubeka enables children to ride to school – to achieve an education. Qhubeka funded bikes also increase a person’s ability to carry goods (by a factor of 5!), and to ultimately improve their lives and those of their families and communities. We have a goal to provide 5000 bicycles this year, along with the training, equipment and know-how to service and maintain them for a lifetime. (As a side note – Qhubeka uses Buffalo bikes – they are as strong as a buffalo, but won’t set any records on the RTI!).

Our passion for riding, for racing and for making a difference also bought us to embrace ANZA – and we thank you for allowing us to be part of this great community in Singapore and throughout Asia.  We look forward to contributing to the ANZA world, and hope that the Dimension Data spirit will be present as we have fun, ride and race together, and give back to the communities that we live in and influence.

James Walls, Sofiane Behraoui, Steve Blackwell and Dave Nicholls
Dimension Data Asia Pacific.